Synopsis


In 2010, a film maker/artist, Hiroshi Sunairi traveled to Xining, China, the edge of old Tibet region, called Amdo Province. Sunairi aimed to create a documentary on the town of Gyegu where the 2010 Yushu earthquake caused a massive disaster. As Sunairi arrived at Gyegu, he grew increasingly ill with altitude sickness, thus he decides to travel elsewhere.
 

Sunairi struggles with having made a choice to leave too soon, possibly as a mistake and delve into a soul-search of culture, landscape and the self in the Tibetan plateau.



http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2011115/

Press Release (by Jonah Groeneboer) 
 In Hiroshi Sunairi’s first feature length film Making Mistakes, we are invited into a hypnotic journey that is at once a travel diary, a record of a spiritual journey and an elegant critique of the empirical eye. In the summer of 2010, Sunairi traveled to Xining, China, at the edge of the old Tibet region, Amdo Province, to document the town of Gyêgu, where the 2010 Yushu earthquake caused a massive disaster. When Sunairi is unable to find a Tibetan translator willing to accompany him, because of the risk involved in taking a foreigner into the closed area, he decides to go alone. Scenes of the trembling landscape from a bus window are shown and the narration turns to nausea as the altitude increases. An examination of the intentions behind the artist’s desire to visit the closed region follows. When Sunairi’s altitude sickness is not assuaged, after arriving in Gyêgu, he travels down to the lower altitudes within the Amdo province. Having left, he develops a deeply troubled feeling of making a mistake in leaving Gyêgu.  What follows is a soul-searching film set in the Tibetan landscape, as well as a meeting of Tibet’s population of Muslims within the Tibetan Plateau. The journey we are invited to experience with the artist is as much emotional as it is physical (The film has a remarkable physical presence). We join Sunairi as he navigates the acute relationships between self and other, culture, language, landscape, and a self-conscious examination of ones own political being.  This experimental film is part documentary and part ethnographic study turned on its head.  Having failed at locating itself in any one of these contexts for a long duration, it demonstrates the artistic process of letting go of control and the resulting submergence that follows.   
Though the film largely focuses on observations of the cultures of Tibet, the filmmaker challenges the impulse to impose preconceptions onto what he sees. His engagement with the people he meets, rarely reflects cultural stereotypes, and instead delves into the personal and everyday life of local residents. In the moments where the film uses more common ethnographic tropes, the set up is made visible. We see the artist offering Tibetan women money to sing a “traditional” song, a classic ethnographic request to perform culture, some refuse and tell him to go away, one accepts, and as she sings, checks her cell phone.   
With the integration of the political, spiritual, and personal, Sunairi offers an alternative to traditional ethnographic studies. The resulting story reveals as much, if not more, about the inner process and desire of the creator. We become visitors to Sunairi’s navigation between his interior present, artistic process and exterior experience of people, landscapes, cities, towns and animals. 
The film culminates in visiting Tsongon Bu (Qinghai lake), the largest salt lake at high altitude in China, as Sunairi contemplates what he can glean from this mistake. This contemplation leads to dissolution of self. He describes this experience “as if I was an hourglass through which birds, wind, light, smell, air, shadow, people, salt and children’s voices all came and went as they are.”  The nausea that is with the artist at the outset of the film is re-introduced, though here, mirroring the films collapsing of genres, we see a collapse of experience: the internal and the external, landscape, narration and otherness. He then, poses the question, “Was it chaos?” The result is an empirical transcendence that indeed resembles the brink of unfathomable ecstatic disorder.

Press Release (by Jonah Groeneboer)
 

 In Hiroshi Sunairi’s first feature length film Making Mistakes, we are invited into a hypnotic journey that is at once a travel diary, a record of a spiritual journey and an elegant critique of the empirical eye. In the summer of 2010, Sunairi traveled to Xining, China, at the edge of the old Tibet region, Amdo Province, to document the town of Gyêgu, where the 2010 Yushu earthquake caused a massive disaster. When Sunairi is unable to find a Tibetan translator willing to accompany him, because of the risk involved in taking a foreigner into the closed area, he decides to go alone. Scenes of the trembling landscape from a bus window are shown and the narration turns to nausea as the altitude increases. An examination of the intentions behind the artist’s desire to visit the closed region follows. When Sunairi’s altitude sickness is not assuaged, after arriving in Gyêgu, he travels down to the lower altitudes within the Amdo province. Having left, he develops a deeply troubled feeling of making a mistake in leaving Gyêgu.  

What follows is a soul-searching film set in the Tibetan landscape, as well as a meeting of Tibet’s population of Muslims within the Tibetan Plateau. The journey we are invited to experience with the artist is as much emotional as it is physical (The film has a remarkable physical presence). We join Sunairi as he navigates the acute relationships between self and other, culture, language, landscape, and a self-conscious examination of ones own political being.  This experimental film is part documentary and part ethnographic study turned on its head.  Having failed at locating itself in any one of these contexts for a long duration, it demonstrates the artistic process of letting go of control and the resulting submergence that follows.  
 

Though the film largely focuses on observations of the cultures of Tibet, the filmmaker challenges the impulse to impose preconceptions onto what he sees. His engagement with the people he meets, rarely reflects cultural stereotypes, and instead delves into the personal and everyday life of local residents. In the moments where the film uses more common ethnographic tropes, the set up is made visible. We see the artist offering Tibetan women money to sing a “traditional” song, a classic ethnographic request to perform culture, some refuse and tell him to go away, one accepts, and as she sings, checks her cell phone.  
 

With the integration of the political, spiritual, and personal, Sunairi offers an alternative to traditional ethnographic studies. The resulting story reveals as much, if not more, about the inner process and desire of the creator. We become visitors to Sunairi’s navigation between his interior present, artistic process and exterior experience of people, landscapes, cities, towns and animals.
 

The film culminates in visiting Tsongon Bu (Qinghai lake), the largest salt lake at high altitude in China, as Sunairi contemplates what he can glean from this mistake. This contemplation leads to dissolution of self. He describes this experience “as if I was an hourglass through which birds, wind, light, smell, air, shadow, people, salt and children’s voices all came and went as they are.”  The nausea that is with the artist at the outset of the film is re-introduced, though here, mirroring the films collapsing of genres, we see a collapse of experience: the internal and the external, landscape, narration and otherness. He then, poses the question, “Was it chaos?” The result is an empirical transcendence that indeed resembles the brink of unfathomable ecstatic disorder.

Music: 
“Song For Japan” Composed and Performed by Aya Nishina (2011)“Equinox” Composed by Toru Takemitsu
"Dung Chen, Gulgyen" from the album, "Tibetan Buddhist Rites from the Monasteries of Bhutan, Volume I, Rituals of the Drukpa Order from Thimpu and Punakha”
“Guitar Improvisations” By Eizo Takashima (2011)“Les Motis” Composed by Stephen Barber, performed by Tosca Strings(Leigh Mahoney, violin; Tracy Seeger, violin;Ames Asbell, viola; Sara Nelson, cello) from the album, “Astral Vinyl”
Sound Recordings by Hiroshi Sunairi: 
"Gyêgu at 4am""Xining"
"Achung Namdzong""Conversation of passengers""Dardzom Gonpa"“Dolma by Jyamba”"Dowi"“Gyêgu Monastery”"Le Dorjedrak Cave""Maque’s business""Mengda Sacred Lake""Mosk""music of Salar Muslim""Professor Jya Yi Drabu interview"“Sacred Lake”"Salar People Talking in a Taxi"“White Stupa by Yadon (on radio)”"Tibetan Class (Qinghai Normal University)""Xia Wu Donjyu reading Tibetan literature""Xia Wu Donjyu interview""Xining""Yellow River"
"Tsongon Bu 1""Tsongon Bu 2""Tsongon Bu 3""Tibetan Folk Song (Tashi Donde)" "Tibetan Folk Song (A Tibetan lady)”“Tibetan Pop Song (A Tibetan boy on a bike)”

Music:
 
“Song For Japan” Composed and Performed by Aya Nishina (2011)
“Equinox” Composed by Toru Takemitsu
"Dung Chen, Gulgyen" from the album, 
"Tibetan Buddhist Rites from the Monasteries of Bhutan, Volume I, 
Rituals of the Drukpa Order from Thimpu and Punakha”
“Guitar Improvisations” By Eizo Takashima (2011)
“Les Motis” Composed by Stephen Barber, performed by Tosca Strings(Leigh Mahoney, violin; Tracy Seeger, violin;Ames Asbell, viola; Sara Nelson, cello) from the album, “Astral Vinyl”

Sound Recordings by Hiroshi Sunairi:
 
"Gyêgu at 4am"
"Xining"
"Achung Namdzong"
"Conversation of passengers"
"Dardzom Gonpa"
“Dolma by Jyamba”
"Dowi"
“Gyêgu Monastery”
"Le Dorjedrak Cave"
"Maque’s business"
"Mengda Sacred Lake"
"Mosk"
"music of Salar Muslim"
"Professor Jya Yi Drabu interview"
“Sacred Lake”
"Salar People Talking in a Taxi"
“White Stupa by Yadon (on radio)”
"Tibetan Class (Qinghai Normal University)"
"Xia Wu Donjyu reading Tibetan literature"
"Xia Wu Donjyu interview"
"Xining"
"Yellow River"
"Tsongon Bu 1"
"Tsongon Bu 2"
"Tsongon Bu 3"
"Tibetan Folk Song (Tashi Donde)" 
"Tibetan Folk Song (A Tibetan lady)”
“Tibetan Pop Song (A Tibetan boy on a bike)”

about the film maker 
Hiroshi Sunairi (Hiroshima, Japan, 1972) is an artist/filmmaker and a part-time faculty in the Art Dept at NYU.Present, Sunairi is working on “air” (airfilm.tumblr.com) a second feature documentary film of a road trip to Fukushima, shot in August 2011.  ”air” is a journal of traveling with a taxi driver through Fukshima prefecture2010, at Art Next Gallery, Sunairi exhibited video project, “Pilgrimage,” his trip to China in 2006 through Beijing to Kham Tibet, destined at sacred Kawakarpo Mountain as an act of pilgrimage.1996, Sunairi presented video project, “On The Road, ” in which the filmmaker traveled across the US to ask a question of “What is life?”  Inspired by the book, “On The Road” by Jack Kerouac. Sunairi filmed legendary Beat poets living in different parts of the US, such as Michael McClure, Howard Hart and etc., citing their prose.Over ten years of time, he has presented a series of large scale installation works with a motif of elephant, about public memory; “A Night of Elephants” at Hiroshima City Museum, Japan, using materials of A-bombed trees in 2005, “White Elephant” at Japan Society, New York, life-sized in ceramic installation in 2007 and “Elephant” at Queens Museum with local trees in 2010.
Contact: sunairi@hotmail.com

about the film maker
 

Hiroshi Sunairi (Hiroshima, Japan, 1972) is an artist/filmmaker and a part-time faculty in the Art Dept at NYU.

Present, Sunairi is working on “air” (airfilm.tumblr.com) a second feature documentary film of a road trip to Fukushima, shot in August 2011.  ”air” is a journal of traveling with a taxi driver through Fukshima prefecture

2010, at Art Next Gallery, Sunairi exhibited video project, “Pilgrimage,” his trip to China in 2006 through Beijing to Kham Tibet, destined at sacred Kawakarpo Mountain as an act of pilgrimage.

1996, Sunairi presented video project, “On The Road, ” in which the filmmaker traveled across the US to ask a question of “What is life?”  Inspired by the book, “On The Road” by Jack Kerouac. Sunairi filmed legendary Beat poets living in different parts of the US, such as Michael McClure, Howard Hart and etc., citing their prose.

Over ten years of time, he has presented a series of large scale installation works with a motif of elephant, about public memory; “A Night of Elephants” at Hiroshima City Museum, Japan, using materials of A-bombed trees in 2005, “White Elephant” at Japan Society, New York, life-sized in ceramic installation in 2007 and “Elephant” at Queens Museum with local trees in 2010.


Contact: sunairi@hotmail.com


Location:


Chapter 1: THE MOUNTAIN Gyêgu, Xining and various locations of China National Highway 214 

Chapter 2: THE RIVERAchung NamdzongChina National Highway 214ChenzaDardzom GonpaDowiGori Dratsang Ganden Pelgyeling Gu-chu ValleyKhamra National ParkLe Dorjedrak Cave/Gompa Mengda Sacred LakeNgagyagak (Lugyagak)Qinghai Normal University Repkong CountyRongpo Gyakhar SengeshongTsongon Bu (Qinghai Lake/Kokonor)XiningXunhua 
Chapter 3: THE OCEANQinghai HouTsongon Bu (Qinghai Lake/Kokonor)

Location:


Chapter 1: THE MOUNTAIN 
Gyêgu, Xining and various locations of China National Highway 214
 
Chapter 2: THE RIVER
Achung Namdzong
China National Highway 214
Chenza
Dardzom Gonpa
Dowi
Gori Dratsang Ganden Pelgyeling 
Gu-chu Valley
Khamra National Park
Le Dorjedrak Cave/Gompa 
Mengda Sacred Lake
Ngagyagak (Lugyagak)
Qinghai Normal University 
Repkong County
Rongpo Gyakhar 
Sengeshong
Tsongon Bu (Qinghai Lake/Kokonor)
Xining
Xunhua

 
Chapter 3: THE OCEAN
Qinghai Hou
Tsongon Bu (Qinghai Lake/Kokonor)

Cast (People):
Dougta and Lumja
Jigme JantsoJi Sha Ku
Jyamba TseringMaquePha Tu MeProfessor. Jya Yi DrabuSonam

Tashi Donde
The students of Qinghai Normal University 
Tse Hua Jya
Tsewa Dolma
Tsuigue

Xia Wu Donjyu

Cast (People):


Dougta and Lumja
Jigme Jantso
Ji Sha Ku
Jyamba Tsering
Maque
Pha Tu Me
Professor. Jya Yi Drabu
Sonam
Tashi Donde
The students of Qinghai Normal University 
Tse Hua Jya
Tsewa Dolma
Tsuigue
Xia Wu Donjyu

Special Thanks to:
Xia Wu Donjyu, TranslatorTsehua Caihuajia, TranslationRay KarataniQinghai Normal UniversityProfessor Jya Yi DrabuJyamba TseringA lama at Gyêgu GompaTenzin TsetanTashi DondeLinda VegaKatsuhiro SaikiEmi NishiwakiYoshi SaitoJuan RecamanTenzin PhuntsogJonah GroeneboerAya NishinaEizo Takashima/Sayaka AshidateShunsuke FuchiokaHenry Bean and Leora Barish



Typographic consultant:
Joel Kimbeck

Special Thanks to:


Xia Wu Donjyu, Translator
Tsehua Caihuajia, Translation
Ray Karatani
Qinghai Normal University
Professor Jya Yi Drabu
Jyamba Tsering
A lama at Gyêgu Gompa
Tenzin Tsetan
Tashi Donde
Linda Vega
Katsuhiro Saiki
Emi Nishiwaki
Yoshi Saito
Juan Recaman
Tenzin Phuntsog
Jonah Groeneboer
Aya Nishina
Eizo Takashima/Sayaka Ashidate
Shunsuke Fuchioka
Henry Bean 
and Leora Barish


Typographic consultant:

Joel Kimbeck

Official Selections: 
2012 The Athens International Film and Video Festival
2012 Filums- the LUMS International Film Festival by the LUMS Media Arts Society (LMA), Lahore, Pakistan
2012 UFO 0110 International Digital Film Festival, New Delhi, India
2012 Queens World Film FestivalThe Honorable Mention Documentary award2012 2nd Gandhinagar International Film FestivalGujarat, India
2012 The Horticultural Society of New York Green Screen Film Series - New York, U S A
2011 Independent Film Quarterly Film & New Media Festival – NYCThe Documentary Audience Award
2013 Movie Night: Making Mistakes at the Village Zendo - New York, U S A

Official Selections:
 

2012 The Athens International Film and Video Festival


2012 Filums- the LUMS International Film Festival
by the LUMS Media Arts Society (LMA), Lahore, Pakistan


2012 UFO 0110 International Digital Film Festival, New Delhi, India


2012 Queens World Film Festival
The Honorable Mention Documentary award


2012 2nd Gandhinagar International Film Festival
Gujarat, India


2012 The Horticultural Society of New York Green Screen Film Series - New York, U S A

2011 Independent Film Quarterly Film & New Media Festival – NYC
The Documentary Audience Award


2013 Movie Night: Making Mistakes at the Village Zendo - New York, U S A




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